DOMESTIC VIOLENCE MONTH: IT’S NOT OVER

October was Domestic Violence Awareness month.

Divorce isn't Easy.

We Can Help

The best place to start is a phone call to Best Law Firm. During this phone call we will put your mind at ease and help you figure out your next step. We have helped thousands of clients and we know that we can help you too.

After your phone call, you will be in a good position to decide what to do next. Most often, the next step is a consultation with one of our attorneys. This consultation will help you understand your specific legal issues and it will provide you with knowledge to move forward in the right direction.

To schedule your consultation give us a call and we will handle the rest. A 1 hour consultation with an attorney is $200. We are located in High Street next to Desert Ridge, the 51 and loop 101. Our convenient location makes it easy for us to serve all four courthouses in the Valley.

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Before you begin

Starting A Divorce

Every Maricopa county divorce requires standard documentation to begin the legal process. A Petition for Dissolution must be filed with the court and whomever filed the Petition must legally serve the opposing party. The forms can be found on the Maricopa County Superior Court Website.

Starting A Divorce

Every Maricopa county divorce requires standard documentation to begin the legal process. A Petition for Dissolution must be filed with the court and whomever filed the Petition must legally serve the opposing party.

Starting A Divorce

Every Maricopa county divorce requires standard documentation to begin the legal process.

How to File For Divorce in Arizona. What you need to know.

Before you begin

Starting A Divorce

Every Maricopa county divorce requires standard documentation to begin the legal process. A Petition for Dissolution must be filed with the court and whomever filed the Petition must legally serve the opposing party. The forms can be found on the Maricopa County Superior Court Website.

Starting A Divorce

Every Maricopa county divorce requires standard documentation to begin the legal process. A Petition for Dissolution must be filed with the court and whomever filed the Petition must legally serve the opposing party.

Starting A Divorce

Every Maricopa county divorce requires standard documentation to begin the legal process.

Before you begin

Starting A Divorce

Every Maricopa county divorce requires standard documentation to begin the legal process. A Petition for Dissolution must be filed with the court and whomever filed the Petition must legally serve the opposing party. The forms can be found on the Maricopa County Superior Court Website.

Starting A Divorce

Every Maricopa county divorce requires standard documentation to begin the legal process. A Petition for Dissolution must be filed with the court and whomever filed the Petition must legally serve the opposing party.

Starting A Divorce

Every Maricopa county divorce requires standard documentation to begin the legal process.

What Happens After You File for Divorce

RMC

The court typically starts by scheduling a Resolution Management Conference (RMC) where the parties and their attorneys, if they are represented, go before the court for the first time. At the RMC, the court will attempt to determine if the parties have reached any agreements.

RMC

The court typically starts by scheduling a Resolution Management Conference (RMC) where the parties and their attorneys, if they are represented, go before the court for the first time. At the RMC, the court will attempt to determine if the parties have reached any agreements.

RMC

The court typically starts by scheduling a Resolution Management Conference (RMC) where the parties and their attorneys, if they are represented, go before the court for the first time. At the RMC, the court will attempt to determine if the parties have reached any agreements.

RMC

The court typically starts by scheduling a Resolution Management Conference (RMC) where the parties and their attorneys, if they are represented, go before the court for the first time. At the RMC, the court will attempt to determine if the parties have reached any agreements.

Frequently Asked Questions About Divorce

How long will it take to get a divorce?

According to Arizona Revised Statute, section 25-329 and Arizona Rules of Civil Procedure 4.1(c), you must wait at least 60 days from the date your spouse was served before going to Court and having the Decree of Dissolution of Marriage entered. This assumes you and your spouse have agreed on the terms or your spouse is in default. When the spouses cannot agree on how to settle issues such as assets and debts, the length of time to get divorced can be longer. If you litigate the issues, it can take a year or longer.

Do I need an attorney for my divorce?

According to Arizona Revised Statute, section 25-329 and Arizona Rules of Civil Procedure 4.1(c), you must wait at least 60 days from the date your spouse was served before going to Court and having the Decree of Dissolution of Marriage entered. This assumes you and your spouse have agreed on the terms or your spouse is in default. When the spouses cannot agree on how to settle issues such as assets and debts, the length of time to get divorced can be longer. If you litigate the issues, it can take a year or longer.

How much does it cost to file a divorce in Maricopa County?

According to Arizona Revised Statute, section 25-329 and Arizona Rules of Civil Procedure 4.1(c), you must wait at least 60 days from the date your spouse was served before going to Court and having the Decree of Dissolution of Marriage entered. This assumes you and your spouse have agreed on the terms or your spouse is in default. When the spouses cannot agree on how to settle issues such as assets and debts, the length of time to get divorced can be longer. If you litigate the issues, it can take a year or longer.

Who actually divorces me?

According to Arizona Revised Statute, section 25-329 and Arizona Rules of Civil Procedure 4.1(c), you must wait at least 60 days from the date your spouse was served before going to Court and having the Decree of Dissolution of Marriage entered. This assumes you and your spouse have agreed on the terms or your spouse is in default. When the spouses cannot agree on how to settle issues such as assets and debts, the length of time to get divorced can be longer. If you litigate the issues, it can take a year or longer.

Do I need an attorney for my divorce?

According to Arizona Revised Statute, section 25-329 and Arizona Rules of Civil Procedure 4.1(c), you must wait at least 60 days from the date your spouse was served before going to Court and having the Decree of Dissolution of Marriage entered. This assumes you and your spouse have agreed on the terms or your spouse is in default. When the spouses cannot agree on how to settle issues such as assets and debts, the length of time to get divorced can be longer. If you litigate the issues, it can take a year or longer.

How much does it cost to file a divorce in Maricopa County?

According to Arizona Revised Statute, section 25-329 and Arizona Rules of Civil Procedure 4.1(c), you must wait at least 60 days from the date your spouse was served before going to Court and having the Decree of Dissolution of Marriage entered. This assumes you and your spouse have agreed on the terms or your spouse is in default. When the spouses cannot agree on how to settle issues such as assets and debts, the length of time to get divorced can be longer. If you litigate the issues, it can take a year or longer.

Who actually divorces me?

According to Arizona Revised Statute, section 25-329 and Arizona Rules of Civil Procedure 4.1(c), you must wait at least 60 days from the date your spouse was served before going to Court and having the Decree of Dissolution of Marriage entered. This assumes you and your spouse have agreed on the terms or your spouse is in default. When the spouses cannot agree on how to settle issues such as assets and debts, the length of time to get divorced can be longer. If you litigate the issues, it can take a year or longer.

Do I need an attorney for my divorce?

According to Arizona Revised Statute, section 25-329 and Arizona Rules of Civil Procedure 4.1(c), you must wait at least 60 days from the date your spouse was served before going to Court and having the Decree of Dissolution of Marriage entered. This assumes you and your spouse have agreed on the terms or your spouse is in default. When the spouses cannot agree on how to settle issues such as assets and debts, the length of time to get divorced can be longer. If you litigate the issues, it can take a year or longer.

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